fbpx

Firearm licenses in SA Part 1

Alarm Specials johannesburg

Firearm licenses in SA Part 1

Global Peace Index - Wikipedia

 

Firearm licenses in SA Part 1

 

License to possess firearm for self-defence

This license under chapter 6 section 13, allows the holder to possess any:

  • shotgun which is not fully or semi-automatic
  • handgun which is not fully automatic.
    The Registrar may issue a license under this section to any natural person who— needs a firearm for self-defense, and cannot reasonably satisfy that need by means other than the possession of a firearm

 

License to possess restricted firearm for self-defense

This license under chapter 6 section 14, allows the holder to possess any:

  • semi-automatic rifle or shotgun, which cannot readily be converted into a fully automatic firearm; or
  • firearm declared by the Minister, by notice in the Gazette, to be a restricted firearm.
    The Registrar may issue a license in terms of this section to any: a natural person who shows that a firearm contemplated in section 13(1) will not provide sufficient protection, and who submits reasonable information to motivate the need for a restricted firearm for self-defense purposes.

 

License to possess firearm for occasional hunting and sports-shooting

This license under chapter 6 section 15, allows the holder to possess any:

  • handgun which is not fully automatic;
  • rifle or shotgun which is not fully or semi-automatic.
    The Registrar may issue a license in terms of this section to any: a natural person who is an occasional hunter or occasional sports person (ex. A person who participates in target shooting but is not an official member of an official target shooting club or a person who participates in hunting but is not an official member of an official hunting club)

 

License to possess firearm for dedicated hunting and dedicated sports-shooting

This license under chapter 6 section 16, allows the holder to possess any:

  • handgun which is not fully automatic;
  • rifle which is not fully automatic;
  • shotgun which is not fully automatic;
  • semi-automatic shotgun.
    The Registrar may issue a license in terms of this section to any: a natural person who is a dedicated hunter or dedicated sports person if the application is accompanied by a sworn statement or solemn declaration from the chairperson of an accredited hunting association or sports-shooting organisation, or someone delegated in writing by him or her, stating that the applicant is a registered member of that association (ex. A person who goes target shooting and is an official member of an official target shooting club or a person who goes hunting and is an official member of an official hunting club)

 

License to possess firearm for professional hunting

This license under chapter 6 section 16

 

License to possess a firearm in a private collection

 

Permit to possess ammunition in a private collection

This permit allows the holder to possess any: piece or pieces of firearms ammunition (NOTE: Not required for people who have licenses for other guns)

 

License to possess a firearm, and permit to possess ammunition, in a public collection

License to possess firearm for business purposes

This license allows the holder to possess any: firearm that isn’t prohibited
The Registrar may issue a license in terms of this section to:

  • a security company;
  • a person who is accredited to provide training in the use of firearms;
  • a person who is accredited to provide firearms for use in theatrical, film, or television productions;
  • a person who is accredited as a professional hunter;
  • a person who is accredited to conduct business in hunting; or
  • any person who is accredited to use firearms for such other business purposes as the Registrar may determine

Prohibited firearms

Prohibited firearms are:

  • Any fully automatic firearm;
  • any gun, cannon, recoilless gun, mortar, light mortar, or launcher manufactured to fire a rocket, grenade, self-propelled grenade, bomb, or explosive device;
  • any frame, body, or barrel of such a fully automatic firearm, gun, cannon, recoilless gun, mortar, light mortar, or launcher;
  • any projectile or rocket manufactured to be discharged from a cannon, recoilless gun or mortar, or rocket launcher;
  • any imitation of any device contemplated in paragraph (a), (b), (c), or (d);
    any firearm— the mechanism of which has been altered so as to enable the discharging of more than one shot with a single depression of the trigger;
  • the caliber of which has been altered without the written permission of the Registrar;
  • the barrel length of which has been altered without the written permission of the Registrar;
  • Semi-automatic rifles and shotguns;
  • Semi-automatic firearms are not prohibited under law. However, semi-automatic long guns are only permitted with a business license, restricted firearms license for self-defense, and dedicated hunting and shooting licenses. There is no official magazine capacity restriction for semi-automatic rifles:
  • Handguns of all firing actions (except fully automatic) are legal under all licenses. There is no magazine capacity restriction for handguns.

 

Carrying of firearms in public

Carrying legally owned firearms in South Africa is legal under all license types and requires no additional permit. No person may carry a firearm in a public place unless the firearm is carried:

  • in the case of a handgun— in a holster or similar holder designed, manufactured, or adapted for the carrying of a handgun and attached to his or her person; or
  • in a rucksack or similar holder; or
  • in the case of any other firearm, in a holder designed, manufactured, or adapted for the carrying of the firearm.

A firearm contemplated in subsection must be completely covered and the person carrying the firearm must be able to exercise effective control over such firearm (carrying firearms in public is allowed if done in that manner).

 

Prohibited places (Gun-Free Zones)

In South Africa, private guns are prohibited by law as per the Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicles Act of 1985 (CAPPVA), in government buildings. The Firearms Control Act of 2000 does allow for firearm-free zones, but this must not be confused with the mandate of the CAPPVA of 1985, which has effectively made all government buildings and vehicles firearm-free by law without the input of the FCA which came about almost two decades later. According to the FCA under section 140, firearm-free zones can be applied for and must be granted FFZ status by the minister. To date, there has been no firearm-free zone declared by the minister.

 

Global Peace Index - Wikipedia

 

CLICK HERE to get a quote on securing your family and home! We’re there for you!

No Comments

Post A Comment